Most popular Adirondack summer activities simply take on a slight twist in the frosty winter. Many summer hiking trails become well-traveled ski and snowshoe trails, and golf courses take on new life as cross-country ski centers. The 46 High Peaks are always accessible for a cold-weather hike, but if you're new to winter hiking consider hiring a licensed Adirondack guide.

Looking for some winter fun in Lake Placid? We've got just the activity for you! Lake Placid is home to two groomed cross-country ski centers that offer skate and classic trails, as well as places to snowshoe. There are also miles and miles of backcountry trails that are suitable for exploration on ski or snowshoe. Skating isn't just an indoor activity here. Head out onto Mirror Lake to find a cleared path for skating and probably some hockey nets, too! Or join aspiring Olympians and leisure skaters at the outdoor Olympic Skating Oval, where Eric Heiden took home five gold medals at the 1980 Winter Olympics. But that's not the only Olympic venue open for use! Just down the road is Whiteface Mountainthe place to be for a world-class downhill skiing and boarding experience. It's got the greatest vertical this side of the Rockies and terrain for all abilities. For other ice fun, ice-covered cliffs and frozen waterfalls become popular ice climbing hangouts in winter. There's something for everyone!

Be prepared

We love the outdoors, and you should too! Please help us protect them by enjoying them responsibly. Before heading out, make sure you're prepared for the journey ahead and familiarize yourself with regulations and weather in the mountains.

The Department of Environmental Conservation is a great resource for more outdoor recreation related information.

Leave No Trace and Love Your ADK

The magic of the Adirondacks is the result of previous generations taking a long view and protecting the mountains, lakes, and rivers within the Blue Line. That tradition continues today as we support and encourage everyone to practice Leave No Trace ethics, which help protect the lands and waters of the Adirondacks.

Leave No Trace Seven Principles